From The Classroom To “Real Life”

Brittany JamesToday’s blog is from Brittany J., a junior Mechanical Engineering major from Lee’s Summit, Mo.

If you asked me what my major was last semester, I would have told you, “I’m a mechanical engineering student who doesn’t want to be an engineer.” Well, that got me a few crazy looks and was always followed up with the question: “Then why on earth are you an engineering student?” Easy. I enjoy my engineering classes more than any others I’ve taken, and I welcome the challenge they bring. In reality, I didn’t know what an engineer actually did. So when I decided to take an internship this summer, it was with the motivation to prove to myself engineering is in fact NOT what I want to do for the rest of my life. That plan has since backfired on me. Thankfully, this is the best backfire I’ve ever experienced. I have actually identified the career that I one day hope to pursue, and I have realized how I can apply my studies to my future. Continue reading

An Incredible Summer at Camp Incredible

Today’s post is from Mercedes Vega, a resident blogger for the TU Office of Admission. Mercedes is a senior Education major from Surprise, AZ.

Mercedes (2)As an education major going into my senior year, the dream summer job would be something that let me work with kids, especially in a school setting.  While I was completing classroom observations this past semester, I was able to learn about Camp Incredible.  Camp Incredible is a summer camp opened to elementary students and is comprised of six one-week camps.  I was given the opportunity to work there as a teacher’s assistant for all six weeks of camp.  I can’t imagine a more perfect summer job!

The first week of camp just finished, and I spent my time with pre-kindergarten and first-grade students.  For an entire week we were part of the Dragons and Princesses class disguised as a music session. There was a performance at the end of the week for other students at camp, as well the kids’ parents.  The performance was on Friday and throughout the week we made a series of crafts so by the time all the kids were standing in front of their audience they were decked out in crowns, princess necklaces, and knight swords. Continue reading

Brittany’s Top 10 Sophomore Learnings

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Brittany J. is a junior Mechanical Engineering major from Lee’s Summit, Mo.

As my sophomore year comes to a close, I AM TERRIFIED. I am terrified that I am now classified as an upperclassman, a junior, half way to the adult world, and half way done with college. Initially, I don’t think I’m ready for any of that. But I don’t want to indicate that my sophomore year was a waste when in reality, it was full of many important life lessons that will guide me throughout the rest of my college years and into the adult world. Here are the Top 10 tidbits that I learned the hard way. So take note of them now, and you’ll be way ahead of the game.

  1. Year Number TWO is brand NEW: Sophomore year is NOT the same as freshman year, and that’s okay (because it’s better). You’re living in a new place, you’re taking classes more specific to your major, and you’re supposed to know what’s going on (key words: supposed to). It’s important to realize that with all of these new adjustments you’ll get to know a variety of new people and you may make new friends. You need to embrace this change and not try to replicate all the memories you have from your freshman year. As soon as you do this, you’ll begin having even better experiences because you aren’t trying to copy the old ones.
  1. Socks with flip-flops is not an acceptable fashion statement: It may not be fashionable, but it is my personal favorite. However, I have a good set of friends that have my best interests at heart. Because of this, they ended up stealing three pairs of my flip-flops and hiding them throughout the year to prevent me from further embarrassing them and myself. More importantly, they help me dress for interviews, proof-read my résumés, and prepare me for the professional world. It may not be here yet, but it’s important to preview the job fairs and research colloquiums so that when junior and senior year rolls around you’re already familiar and comfortable in those professional environments. By the time you will be looking for a job, you’ll be an old pro.

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